Signly adds sign language to websites.

People for whom sign language is their first, preferred or only language have diverse literacy levels. Signly challenges the idea that English-only websites adequately serve sign language users – some people don’t or can’t easily use English.

Since 2017, Signly has had a singular mission: to deliver sign language everywhere.

Signature collaborate with Signly to Boost Digital Accessibility on Their Website

Since 1982, Signature has supported more than 500,000 people to learn British Sign Language. Signature is proud to be the leading awarding body for deaf communication and language qualifications in the UK. The organisation continually strives to create qualifications that will provide learners with the skills they need to build successful careers and simply raise deaf awareness.

Signature is delighted to team up with Signly, bringing sign language translations to our website. This is a big leap in making our digital space accessible to everyone and amplifies our commitment to deaf awareness. We value our strong ties with the deaf community, making Signly's inclusion an essential step forward.

Tim Scannell, Signly Ambassador signed, “"We're very excited about our collaboration with Signature. This partnership not only enhances accessibility but also represents another step toward a more inclusive digital world. Together, we're turning the vision of sign language access everywhere into a reality." — Tim Scannell, Signly Ambassador

Lindsay Foster, Executive Director at Signature said, “I am thrilled to be working alongside Signly, a company which shares the same values as Signature. The collaboration will ensure digital inclusion and is a step towards full accessibility.


Multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma, also known as myeloma, is a type of bone marrow cancer. Bone marrow is the spongy tissue at the centre of some bones that produces the body's blood cells.

It's called multiple myeloma as the cancer often affects several areas of the body, such as the spine, skull, pelvis and ribs.

Symptoms of multiple myeloma

In the early stages, myeloma may not cause any symptoms. It's often only suspected or diagnosed after a routine blood or urine test.

Eventually, myeloma causes a wide range of problems, including:

  • a persistent bone pain, usually in the back, ribs or hips
  • tiredness, weakness and shortness of breath – caused by anaemia
  • high levels of calcium in the blood (hypercalcaemia) – which may cause symptoms including extreme thirst, stomach pain, needing to pee frequently, constipation or confusion
  • weight loss
  • blurred vision, dizziness or headaches – caused by thickened blood (hyperviscosity)
  • repeated infections
  • bruising and unusual bleeding – such as frequent nosebleeds, bleeding gums and heavy periods
  • weak bones that break (fracture) easily – if this affects the spine, it might cause symptoms such as pins and needles, numbness and weakness in the legs and feet, and problems controlling your bladder and bowels, which requires emergency investigation
  • kidney problems

Myeloma doesn't usually cause a lump or tumour. Instead, it damages the bones and affects the production of healthy blood cells.

Read more about the symptoms of multiple myeloma.

When to see a GP

See a GP if you have any of the symptoms of multiple myeloma. While they're unlikely to be caused by cancer, it's best to get a proper diagnosis.

Your GP will examine you to check for bone tenderness, bleeding, signs of infection and any other symptoms that suggest you might have myeloma. They may also arrange blood and urine tests.

If myeloma is suspected, you'll be referred to a consultant haematologist (a specialist in blood conditions) for further tests and treatment.

Read more about diagnosing multiple myeloma.

Causes of multiple myeloma

It's not known exactly what causes multiple myeloma. However, there is a close link between multiple myeloma and a condition called monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS).

MGUS is where there is an excess of protein molecules, called immunoglobulins, in your blood. This doesn't cause any symptoms and doesn't need treatment.

Every year, around 1 in every 100 people with MGUS go on to develop multiple myeloma.

There is no known way to delay or prevent this, so people with MGUS will have regular tests to check for cancer.

Multiple myeloma is also more common in:

  • men
  • adults over 60 – most cases are diagnosed at around the age of 70, and cases affecting people under the age of 40 are rare
  • black people – multiple myeloma is about twice as common in black populations than white and Asian populations
  • people with a family history of MGUS or multiple myeloma

Treatment for multiple myeloma

Treatment can often help to control the condition for several years, but most cases of multiple myeloma can't be cured. Research is ongoing to try to find new treatments.

Treatment for multiple myeloma usually includes:

  • anti-myeloma medicines to destroy the myeloma cells or control the cancer when it comes back (relapses)
  • medicines and procedures to prevent and treat problems caused by myeloma – such as bone pain, fractures and anaemia

As part of your treatment, you may be asked if you want to take part in a clinical trial to help researchers develop better treatments for multiple myeloma.

Read more about treating multiple myeloma.

Support groups for multiple myeloma

If you've been diagnosed with multiple myeloma, you may want to contact a local or national support group, such as Myeloma UK.

Your local haematology team will be able to direct you to helpful resources.

Support groups can offer more information and advice. They can also often put you in touch with other people in a similar situation so you can share advice and talk about your experiences.

Myeloma UK: help and support

Myeloma UK: find a local support group

Blood Cancer UK: blood cancer online community forum

Page last reviewed: 02 June 2021
   Next review due: 02 June 2024


Signly adds synchronous in-vision sign language to websites for individuals who are deaf and favour sign language over written English.

Lloyds Banking Group is deeply grateful for everything you shared at the focus group. Your ideas and feedback are really useful in helping us to improve what we offer to customers, particularly for our Deaf customers. The team will now look at all your recommendations and work out which could be put into practice.  Your feedback will not only help improve what we already offer but also consider how else we can provide an inclusive and accessible banking experience for all. Lloyds Bank, Halifax, Bank of Scotland and MBNA already provide a variety of inclusive banking services to support its Deaf customers who use sign language. 1. We provide video relay services via Sign Video. 2 We use an innovative technology called Signly. Signly delivers sign language on our websites. It's a powerful tool for those who are more comfortable with sign language than written English. Whether it's terms and conditions, account information, or any other written communication, Signly translates it into sign language, making banking services more accessible to Deaf customers. 3 Lloyds also provides sign language interpreters at local branches at no extra cost. When a customer books an appointment and requests an interpreter, the bank ensures that a professional sign language interpreter is available to assist during the appointment.  Or, if you prefer your own interpreter, the bank can contribute to the cost of this.

Making air travel more accessible, that's the mission behind the latest Government guidance. This guidance was created for people like me who use sign language, as well as for those with hearing loss. Take a look at Signly, an innovative tool that adds British Sign Language to any digital content. If you're involved in the aviation sector and you're seeking ways to elevate your passenger experience, especially for us sign language users, we'd love to connect with you. Please reach out for a meeting. Just use the booking link shown below.


In the light of the moon a little egg lay on a leaf.

One Sunday morning the warm sun came up….and POP, out of the egg came a tiny, very hungry caterpillar.

He started looking for some food.

On Monday he ate through one apple.

But he was still hungry.

On Tuesday he ate through two pears, but he was still hungry.

On Wednesday he ate through three plums, but he was still hungry.

On Thursday he ate through four strawberries, but he was still hungry.

On Friday he ate through five oranges, but he was still hungry.

On Saturday he ate through one piece of chocolate cake, one ice cream cone, one pickle, one slice of Swiss cheese, one slice of salami, one lollipop, one piece of cherry pie, one sausage, one cupcake, and one slice of watermelon.

That night he had a stomach ache!

The next day was Sunday again.

The caterpillar ate through one nice leaf, and after that he felt better.

Now he wasn't hungry anymore--and he wasn't a little caterpillar anymore.

He was a big fat caterpillar.

He built a small house, called a cocoon, around himself.

He stayed inside for more than two weeks.

Then he nibbled a hole in the cocoon, pushed his way out and...He became a beautiful butterfly!


A very good afternoon to you.

We've seen fine, dry conditions, for many this week. A similar theme in the next few days. Sunny Skies for the vast majority, it's looking promising, but we do keep those chilly evenings and nights for the time being.

This is the earlier satellite and radar picture - we've got picture-perfect big blue skies across the bulk of Britain and Northern Ireland.

Just a little more cloud here and there, but some of this cloud will be nibbled away in the next few hours, and where the sunshine gets to work, temperatures responding quite well - highs of 22 or 23 degrees - where we've got the cloud cover, where we've got the breeze around the coastlines, those temperatures a little more modest, just a little cooler and fresher feeling.

But we'll see late and low sunshine before dusk, with the days so drawn out this time of year. And then, under the clear skies - temperatures slide once more tonight, particularly out in the countryside and in rural spots - a little chillier here come the small hours, with just a touch of mist and murk but a good deal of fine dry weather into the new day.

See you soon.


Anna is profoundly deaf from birth and is bi-lingual in English and BSL.  Anna is training to become a qualified BSL Translator.  This came about from doing lots of BSL translation for worship songs and some videos for her church through the lockdowns.  She found doing BSL translation very rewarding and open things up more for the Deaf Community.  Anna is a qualified BSL tutor and teach Signature levels 1, 2 and 3.  Anna first taught BSL in Winchester in 2000.

In her free time, Anna is a Methodist Local Preacher and leads a church service once a month.  She also lead services for the Deaf Community.   She has recently taken part in a musical at her church in Joseph and the technicolour dreamcoat and translated the songs into BSL.

Anna has always believed in improving access for the Deaf Community through her teaching and now expanding on this through becoming a BSL translator.

Introduction

INTRODUCTION TO Deaf awareness

FOR HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE PROFESSIONALS

START

START

MENU

HELP

EXIT

PROGRESS

PROGRESS

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Welcome

Hello, and a warm welcome.

This module has been developed by Merseyside Society for Deaf People (MSDP). We are on a mission to advance equality for Deaf people and those with hearing loss across Merseyside.  

We provide specialist services and training in a range of communication methods, and we are home to one of the largest Deaf Social Clubs in the country.  

Our team also delivers community-based social care, duty drop-in sessions and environmental aids assessments.

Click NEXT to continue.

Before we start, here’s a quick guide to using this module.  To complete this module, you will need to complete a range of interactions. Instructions will be provided to let you know what to do.

Click the Continue button.

Continue

You can use the NEXT and BACK buttons to navigate.  

The next button will be locked until you complete the interactions on the screen, so you will never miss anything.  

Click the Continue button.

The module should take you around 60-90 minutes to complete.  

You can track your progress using the progress bar.  

Click the Continue button.

Start the module

In an instance where an interaction is not accessible, then an accessible alternative will be provided. These can be accessed by clicking the Accessible Icon in the player.  

Click the Continue button.

To close the module, click the EXIT button.  

When you exit, your current progress will be saved. When returning to the module, you will have the option to resume from where you left, or restart the module.  

Click the Continue button.

This module contains a menu through which you will explore the content, and it is broken into sections to support you in taking convenient breaks.

Once available, you can click the MENU button at any time to return to the menu. However, it’s important to note that you will lose your current place in the module if you do this.  

Click the Continue button.

For a recap on how to use this module, click the HELP button at any time.  

Click the Continue button.

One last thing, throughout this module we are going to use the term d/Deaf to refer people with hearing loss unless we are talking about something specific to that hearing loss.  

Click the Continue button.

This module is comprised of four sections. When you complete a section, the next one will unlock.  To start, click on Section 1. Types of deafness and communication preferences.

Click on Section 2. The deaf community.

Click on Section 3. Challenges and health services.

Click on Section 4. Practical things you can do.

Well done, you’ve completed all four sections. Click NEXT to continue.

You have reached the end of this prototype, Click NEXT to continue.

Types of deafness and communication preferences

Types of deafness and communication preferences

The Deaf community

Challenges and health services

Accessing health and social care

Practical things you can do

Summary and close

Aside from the moral imperative to treat d/Deaf people with respect, meeting their needs also helps you to build meaningful relationships with them.

Click on each of the images to learn more about other reasons it’s important.

Click NEXT to continue.

Improved access saves time, money and supports your organisation’s inclusion goals.

Helps you comply with your legal obligations including Equality Act 2010 and Accessibility Information Standard.

06 - 1 in 5 people...

  1. in 5 people are affected by deafness

Click NEXT to continue.

Every interaction can potentially involve communication misunderstandings or a lack of access to information.

Click NEXT to continue.

Think about all the interactions you have in a day, how many of these people have hearing issues and how does this affect their experience?

Click NEXT to continue.

Everyone is different and has different preferences and requirements. That is just as true within the Deaf community.  

One solution doesn’t meet everyone's needs.  

So although we are going to look at some commonly used support methods used by members of the Deaf community, it’s important that you never assume what will or won’t be helpful to someone.  

Always ask them what’s best for them. They are the expert on themselves!  

Click NEXT to continue.

The first step towards meeting needs is getting the language right. People describe their deafness in many ways.

Click NEXT to continue.

Click on the images to review five of the terms, sometimes used.

Degree of deafness – mild, moderate, severe or profound.

Onset - when it began, e.g. age-related or born deaf.

Clinical measurement, e.g. a loss above 65 decibels.

Functionality - what the person can hear, e.g. whispering in a quiet room, bird song.

You may have heard the terms hard of hearing,

d/Deaf or Deafblind. Deaf is spelt with a capital D to denote identity.


INVITATION TO PARTICIPATE IN RESEARCH PROJECT ON 26 JULY 2023. ESquared has a fun job for you on 6 July! We work with a big bank, and we want to make it easier for people who are deaf to use the bank. We are looking for volunteers who use British Sign Language (BSL), as their main way to communicate. We will have a group chat that will last between 1.5 to 2 hours. For helping us, ESquared will give you £50 and pay for your trip to get there and back. The chat will be in the middle of London. If you want to help, or know someone else that could, email us and we’ll contact you and tell you exactly where to go and when to be there. Thank you so much for thinking about helping us!


Hello and welcome to the Signly stand. I am delighted to extend a warm welcome to all the deaf sign language users attending the Norfolk Deaf Festival. Signly is a revolutionary technology designed to enhance accessibility for the deaf community. It bridges the communication gap by providing sign language translations on websites. It only takes 10 minutes to add Signly. I am delighted to announce that Signly is offering its translation services free of charge to deaf charities, clubs, and organizations. This means that these organizations can benefit from Signly's technology to improve accessibility in their own events and activities. Please note that this offer is on a first-come, first-served basis, so I encourage interested parties to take advantage of this wonderful opportunity as soon as possible. Scan the QR code to register interest. We believe that everyone should have equal access to information and opportunities. Thank you and have a fantastic time at the Norfolk Deaf Festival!

Come and join in on the mainstage! Have a go at:   Spin -  SPIN is a participatory daytime dance rave with Deaf hosts and a DJ. Inspired by club and social dance scenes.  SPIN celebrates collectivity, ritual, hedonism.  Deaf hosts Anna Seymour, Chris Fonseca, and Raffie Julien are excited to invite you to join them for this guided dance event. No dance experience is necessary and all are welcome.  Michael Easton from Back to Fitness Been meaning to workout? Join Michael from Back to Fitness as he takes you through some fun moves!    

Sonic Sound Show. Have you ever wondered what sound is or how it travels? . How do we even know a sound is being made? . Find out as we use tuning forks, speakers, ping-pong balls, smoke rings, and an oversized model of the ear to explore the world of sound.. On the mainstage at . friday 7th july - 12.05pm. saturday 8th july - 1.20pm. .

Escape from the Movies!. Can you spot our Movie Characters who have escaped from the Silver Screen? Creeping along the street, causing chaos or creating movie magic, join our walkabout characters in their epic adventure through the festival!. This project has been inspired by Chaplin, Laurel and Hardy and a workshop with local young deaf people exploring physical comedy. . Check out the three short films created by them shown on the big screen outside on Friday 7th July at 11.25am and 1.30pm . Saturday 8th July at 12pm and 2.50pm.


ESquared has a fun job for you! We work with a big bank, and we want to make it easier for people who are deaf to use the bank. We are looking for volunteers who use British Sign Language (BSL), as their main way to communicate. You also need to have a bank account and a credit card or have thought about getting one. We will have a group chat planned at 12.30pm on 14th July that will last between 2 to 2.5 hours. There will be two people leading the chat, and one of them will be Deaf, and they'll use BSL. People who can hear will be watching the chat with interpreters to help them understand. We'll make a video of the chat so we can watch it again later and understand everything you said. We'll ask you to read a letter and tell us what you think about it. You'll need a mobile phone because we'll ask you to answer some questions before we start. The answers won't have your name on them, but they'll help us learn a little bit about you. For helping us, ESquared will give you £50 and pay for your trip to get there and back. You'll just have to fill out a simple form on the day. If you're okay with helping us, we need you to sign a paper on the day that says it's okay for us to use what we learn from the chat. We promise we won't put anything on social media or use any pictures without asking you first. We will go through it on the day if you happy to come along. The chat will be in the centre of London. If you want to help, or know someone else that could, email us and we’ll contact you and tell you exactly where to go and when to be there. Thank you so much for thinking about helping us!


Hello and welcome to the Signly stand. I am delighted to extend a warm welcome to all the deaf sign language users attending the Deaf Street Party. Signly is a revolutionary technology designed to enhance accessibility for the deaf community. It bridges the communication gap by providing sign language translations on websites. It only takes 10 minutes to add Signly. I am delighted to announce that Signly is offering its translation services free of charge to deaf charities, clubs, and organizations. This means that these organizations can benefit from Signly's technology to improve accessibility in their own events and activities. Please note that this offer is on a first-come, first-served basis, so I encourage interested parties to take advantage of this wonderful opportunity as soon as possible. Scan the QR code to register interest. We believe that everyone should have equal access to information and opportunities. Thank you and have a fantastic time at the Deaf Street Party


Energy Consumers - Vulnerability Strategy 2025. Not everyone communicates in the same way. But that doesn't mean they should be left behind. Meet Jane, a BSL user, struggling with understanding the details on her utility provider's website because English is not her first language. According to Ofgem's vulnerability guidance, utility companies must consider people for whom English isn't a first language. And that's where we come in. We're Signly, the leading innovator in adding British Sign Language to digital services. With our services, Jane can now navigate her utility provider's website with ease, understanding every detail through BSL.  But it's not just Jane. There are thousands of people who use BSL. You can make their lives easier by making your digital services accessible.  We have helped numerous businesses reach a wider audience by incorporating BSL into their digital platforms. So why not meet with us, let's discuss how we can make your digital services more inclusive, together. Here's how to get in touch.


Deaf translators tell us about their job bridging the gap between written and sign languages (BSL)

Today, we're diving into the world of deaf translators—a unique role that's so much more than just bridging the gap between written and sign languages. Deaf translators navigate not just language, but culture, emotions, and nuances that might be lost on hearing translators.

For this article, four deaf translators from Signly, who translate articles on this site, gave their answers to the questions. They are: Anna Herriman (AH), Amy Beckett (AB), Ayesha Gavin (AG) and Matt Kirby (MH).

They've also translated their answers, so just click on the signing hands (in the bottom right-hand corner of this page) and then click on the text to see them in action!

What first sparked your interest in becoming a sign language translator?

AB - Before all this, I was a Mental Health support worker for six years in three different placements. These placements focused on supporting Deaf individuals with Mental Health issues and empowering them. As part of that role, I supported Deaf individuals with English, translating letters, bills and text messages from English to simplified BSL to help them understand. This role made me realise how much I enjoyed translating, giving Deaf individuals access.

AH - I am a qualified BSL teacher teaching Signature levels 1-3. It was the first COVID pandemic lockdown that sparked my interest into becoming a sign language translator. When churches closed, I was asked to translate hymns into BSL on video and I thought wow, I can do this!

AG - I run my own business as a qualified Deaf BSL teacher, teaching levels 1-6 and running interpreter/translator courses, as well as working with families of Deaf children. There is not much accessible information out there, so I wanted to do something about it. I have always enjoyed languages and translation so this seemed the natural way to do it.

MK - I am a CODA, so all my life I've translated English into BSL for my parents. Many friends told me that I should be translator, but I didn’t think I could - I'm an actor so I was good at translating from an English script to BSL, I didn't think about more than that. So becoming a translator was thanks to my wife who encouraged me to do the translation course! And I loved it.

Can you please walk us through a typical day in your life as a sign language translator?

AB - As a translator, I translate multiple different websites which keeps my brain active. I enjoy the variety!

AH - I am currently training, and I am looking to become a full-time freelance sign language translator in the future. I work with the Signly filming studio at home, and we translate various websites. We work together as a team.

How do you keep up-to-date with the evolving nuances and changes in sign language?

AG - Through contact with the Deaf community and Deaf professionals, going to events and webinars organised by ASLI or CPD providers. I’m lucky to be in a few networks which offer good quality support and training, and I love learning, so I read lots and try to speak to as many people as possible who can teach me something new.

As a sign language translator, what are some of the most challenging aspects of your work and how do you overcome these challenges?

AH - The most challenging aspect of my work is translating material that you don’t have a lot of background knowledge for, or when the information is very complex. To overcome this, I read up on the subject or seek assistance from colleagues.

MK - For me it is a challenging job to make sure my translations are clear and understandable to deaf people, I don’t want to give misleading information. I am very lucky that my colleagues and I discuss how to make sure we're using the right signs and making the content clear.

How has your personal experience as a deaf individual influenced your approach to your profession?

AB - I consider myself to be both in the Deaf and Hearing worlds. Being able to have those experiences in both worlds, this helps me to understand the importance of being able to access languages. This is why I aim to provide this access to Deaf individuals who might struggle with English language.

How would you describe the importance of sign language translators in empowering the deaf community?

AH - The role itself empowers Deaf people as it give them a specialist role in which they have full understanding of the barriers in the hearing world and work together to break down barriers.

MK - By facilitating effective communication, sign language translators empower the deaf community to express themselves, advocate for their rights, and participate more fully in various aspects of society.

What does the future hold? What do you think of AI translating sign language?

AG - I firmly believe that at the moment AI cannot replace the human translator, and it will be a long time before it can. So why not invest in training people to do the job and solve the problem of accessibility for BSL users now? And I think if people do the job and are paid for their skills and experience, it is better for the economy and the awareness of BSL and the Deaf community, so it benefits everyone, not just the Deaf community.

Have you had any opportunities to influence or develop sign language through your work?

AH - Through my work, regularly check terms / vocab that I am not sure of a sign for. Therefore, this role helps me to grow my BSL vocabulary further and also teaches me how to find best way of translating so that the information is easy for the Deaf Community to understand.

What book, film, or piece of media would you recommend to anyone interested in better understanding the experience of the deaf community?

AG - BSL Zone, See Hear, The Silent Child, Name Me Lawand, etc, there’s lots!

How does a person train to be a translator?

AH - A person can train to be a translator either through the University route (I.e. Wolverhampton, UClan (University of Central Lancashire), Herriot-Watt University etc) or through registered Signature centres that are accredited to deliver the Signature Level 6 Diploma in Sign Language Interpreting and Translation or Signature Level 6 Diploma in Sign Language Translation. course. You would need to have Signature BSL level 6 (including NVQ) before you can train to become a sign language translator. The registered centres can be found on the Signature website.

How many translators are there in the UK? Why so few? Is it enough?

AH - What I understand is that there are about 29 Registered qualified sign language translators in the UK. There are not many at the moment as it is a relatively new role.

AG - Not enough is the simple answer to ‘how many’, but it’s the same for all visual language professionals. I think its because becoming a translator means you need high levels of English and BSL in order to understand things to translate them, and not everyone has that.

What advice would you give to young deaf individuals who are interested in training to be a translator?

AG - Go for it! Lots to learn but it’s a very interesting and rewarding job, and you get to provide access for the Deaf community, which is the most important thing.

Check out Signly here.

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Hi <Colleague’s first name>. Great news! It has been nearly 3 years since your current device {<Asset ID XXXXXXXXXX>} was leased to LBG, so it’s time to order your replacement. Just so you know, your new device must be delivered, and old device returned within the next 21 days to avoid a charge to your cost centre.  Order your new device now. Please tap the button below to order your new device from IT@LBG. This must be completed within 14 days! How it works. To Request your new laptop, you’ll need to provide an email address that accepts external emails (a personal email address is fine if your work email address does not allow external emails). The delivery date and time is automated and will be up to 5 working days after you complete the form. The courier will attempt delivery twice. You will Receive a laptop that is more than sufficient to support you in your current role, but it may be a different spec or manufacturer to your existing one. (Alternative peripherals may be required to be ordered). Please note, there is no option to choose an alternative laptop to the one deployed to you.  The Return is set up automatically and will happen up to 5 days after receiving your new laptop, you will be contacted via email and SMS by the courier firm providing the date and time of the collection, you will be able to change this if the original collection dates and times do not suit you. You will also receive an email providing you with a reference number once your request has been submitted, this email will contain more detail on the Receive and Return steps of the Refresh process. You can find frequently asked questions (FAQs) here: Device Refresh – FAQs. Keeping Devices Safe. For guidance on how to look after your laptops, and other devices, please visit Safe & Secure – Thanks. This is not a phishing simulation email, but if in doubt you can search SharePoint for “Device Refresh” on how to replace your device using. We recommend you retain a copy of this mail to refer to throughout the replacement process. 


Hi <Colleague’s first name>,

Great news! It has been nearly 3 years since your current device {<Asset ID XXXXXXXXX>} was leased to LBG, so it’s time to order your replacement. Just so you know, your new device must be delivered, and old device returned within the next 21 days to avoid a charge to your cost centre.

Order your new device now.

Please tap the button below to order your new device from IT@LBG. This must be completed within 14 days!

A green sign with white text

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

How it works

To Request your new laptop, you’ll need to provide an email address that accepts external emails (a personal email address is fine if your work email address does not allow external emails). The delivery date and time is automated and will be up to 5 working days after you complete the form. The courier will attempt delivery twice.

You will Receive a laptop that is more than sufficient to support you in your current role, but it may be a different spec or manufacturer to your existing one. (Alternative peripherals may be required to be ordered). Please note, there is no option to choose an alternative laptop to the one deployed to you.

The Return is set up automatically and will happen up to 5 days after receiving your new laptop, you will be contacted via email and SMS by the courier firm providing the date and time of the collection, you will be able to change this if the original collection dates and times do not suit you.

You will also receive an email providing you with a reference number once your request has been submitted, this email will contain more detail on the Receive and Return steps of the Refresh process.

You can find frequently asked questions (FAQs) here: Device Refresh - FAQs

Keeping Devices Safe.

For guidance on how to look after your laptops, and other devices, please visit Safe & Secure – Thanks.

This is not a phishing simulation email, but if in doubt you can search SharePoint for “Device Refresh” on how to replace your device using.

We recommend you retain a copy of this mail to refer to throughout the replacement process.


Those

Those mobile branches will be replaced over the next couple of years

mobile

branches

will

be

replaced

over

the

next

couple

of

years

Well, hello and welcome. My name is Elizabeth Robinson. I'm director of the Grantham Research into the Grantham Research Institute here at the London School of Economics and I'm absolutely delighted to be sharing this event. So this event marks the launch of the Grantham Research Institutes Global Trends in Climate Change Litigation 2023 Snapshot Report. You can see one look at my notes, memorize the title, but this presents an overview of climate litigation highlighting recent developments and future trends and the report.

The report is really widely read and cited by civil society organizations, policymakers, the legal community, judges, financiers, scholars, media around the world. And I hope everyone here so welcome to everyone here are in-person audience and also welcome to us. I say virtual audience. I should say that today, because you're not virtual, you just happen to be online. So welcome to our non virtual audience who happens to be online and not with us in person.

And you're all very welcome. This is also part of London Climate Action Week's flagship event series. So it's really it's really nice. It's part of this event as well because. So it should be so. So yes, so how are the events going to run? The event's going to start with a short presentation from the authors, Joanna Setser and Katherine Higham.

Welcome to the station

Berlin Central Station